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WSIS+10 Review: Non-Paper

1 Leave a comment on paragraph 1 0 ====

2 Leave a comment on paragraph 2 0 El documento abajo servirá como punto de partida para el documento final de la revisión general de la Asamblea General de la ONU sobre los resultados de la Cumbre Mundial sobre la Sociedad de la Información. 

3 Leave a comment on paragraph 3 0 Este sitio web no es una plataform oficial de la ONU, sino un lugar de recursos para potenciar la participación de los representantes de la sociedad civil de América Latina en el proceso de revisión de la CMSI. Sus comentários seran simplemente compilados por los gestores de esta plataforma en un documento que presente las diversas visiones de representantes de la sociedade civil de la región para el Secretariado. 

4 Leave a comment on paragraph 4 0 La versión original de este documento, publicada por la Asamble General está disponible acá.

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6 Leave a comment on paragraph 6 0 UN General Assembly

7 Leave a comment on paragraph 7 0 WSIS+10 Review: Non-Paper

8 Leave a comment on paragraph 8 0 Preamble

9 Leave a comment on paragraph 9 0 We reaffirm the vision of a people-centred, inclusive and development-oriented Information Society defined by the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) as well as the objectives and norms established in the Geneva Declaration of Principles, the Geneva Plan of Action, the Tunis Commitment and the Tunis Agenda for the Information Society.

10 Leave a comment on paragraph 10 0 We recognize that Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is an integral and key part of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, both as a means of implementation and a target of the Sustainable Development Goals.

11 Leave a comment on paragraph 11 0 We recognize the digital economy as an important and growing part of the global economy and global sustainable development.

12 Leave a comment on paragraph 12 0 Many innovations have transformed the ICT landscape and presented new opportunities for ICT to contribute to sustainable development. These include fixed and wireless broadband, mobile Internet, smartphones and tables, cloud computing, social media and big data.

13 Leave a comment on paragraph 13 0 However, there are still critical digital divides between and within countries, which need to be addressed, and new challenges have arisen as a result of rapid changes in technology.

14 Leave a comment on paragraph 14 0 Promoting access to ICTs and the Internet for all, as well as the ability of people to use and create ICTs, is fundamental to the WSIS vision. Particular attention should be paid to the special challenges facing the most vulnerable countries and in particular, African countries, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing states, as well as the specific challenges facing women, young people, persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples and marginalized communities.

15 Leave a comment on paragraph 15 0 Multi-stakeholder cooperation and engagement are essential to the successful realization of the WSIS vision. We applaud the work of diverse stakeholders in implementing WSIS outcomes, in their various roles and responsibilities, and we reaffirm the value of multi-stakeholder cooperation and engagement.

16 Leave a comment on paragraph 16 0 We recognize the important contributions to the WSIS review made by the Commission on Science and Technology for Development (CSTD), the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO); we take note with appreciation of the WSIS review by CSTD, the outcome documents from the UNESCO-organized conference Towards Knowledge Societies for Peace and Sustainable Development and the WSIS+10 High Level Event organized by ITU. We take note of the WSIS+10 Statement, which was agreed at that Event.

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18 Leave a comment on paragraph 18 0 The Digital Divide

19 Leave a comment on paragraph 19 0 There have been considerable increases in ICT connectivity, use and creation that support sustainable development. In particular, the number of mobile phone subscriptions is estimated to have risen from 2.2 billion in 2005 to 7.1 billion in 2015, and the number of Internet users from 1.0 billion to 3.2 billion.

20 Leave a comment on paragraph 20 0 However, digital divide remain, both within and between countries. There is a risk that these divides will widen as technology and services evolve, and as the speed and quality of connectivity become more important, particularly with the evolution of broadband, which is now essential for achieving sustainable development.

21 Leave a comment on paragraph 21 0 We also draw attention to the persistent gender digital divide, and commit to mainstream gender in the implementation of the WSIS vision, notably through the Action Lines. We encourage all stakeholders to take measures, as soon as possible, to substantially increase the number of women with Internet access.

22 Leave a comment on paragraph 22 0 Harnessing the potential of ICT for development requires truly equitable access for all. Priority should be given to ensuring that ICTs are affordable and relevant, that content is available in different languages and formats that are accessible to all people, and for them to have capabilities to make use of ICTs.

23 Leave a comment on paragraph 23 0 We take note of the targets for the growth of access, inclusiveness, sustainability, innovation and partnership in ICTs, as agreed by the international community under the Connect 2020 Agenda, adopted at the ITU Plenipotentiary Conference in 2014.

24 Leave a comment on paragraph 24 0 We encourage all stakeholders to take measures to achieve universal Internet access by 2030.

25 Leave a comment on paragraph 25 0 Moving forward, and as reflected in the Tunis Agenda, we reaffirm the call for increased efforts in capacity building, technology transfer, and multilingualism, to address the digital divide.

26 Leave a comment on paragraph 26 0 ICT for Development

27 Leave a comment on paragraph 27 0 The spread of ICT and accelerating global interconnectedness has great potential to accelerate progress across the economic, social, and environmental pillars of sustainable development. The Information Society will play a critical enabling role in achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

28 Leave a comment on paragraph 28 0 We recognize that information and communications technologies have the potential to provide new solutions to development challenges, particularly in the context of globalization, and can foster sustained, inclusive and equitable economic growth and sustainable development, competitiveness, access to information and knowledge, poverty eradication and social inclusion that will help to expedite the integration of all countries, especially developing countries, in particular the least developed countries, into the global economy.

29 Leave a comment on paragraph 29 0 Priority should be given to leveraging the critical role that ICT plays in enabling resource efficiency, particularly of energy and water, as well as sustainable urban development and the evolution of renewable technologies.

30 Leave a comment on paragraph 30 0 We recognize the opportunity afforded by clean energy and reuse, recycling, and disposal of ICT waste to mitigate environmental impacts of ICT use and growth.

31 Leave a comment on paragraph 31 0 Human Rights

32 Leave a comment on paragraph 32 0 We reaffirm all human rights and fundamental freedoms, including the right to development, to achieve the WSIS vision. We underscore the need for respecting freedom of expression, the independence of press and the right to privacy. We emphasize that no person shall be subjected to arbitrary or unlawful interference with his or her privacy, family, home, or correspondence, consistent with countries’obligations under international human rights law.

33 Leave a comment on paragraph 33 0 We reaffirm that the same rights that people have offline must also be protected online.

34 Leave a comment on paragraph 34 0 Internet Governance

35 Leave a comment on paragraph 35 0 The Internet has continued to grow in number of users, speed of access, range of services, and many other ways, necessitating fast-changing and flexible governance structures.

36 Leave a comment on paragraph 36 0 There is a general agreement that the governance of the Internet should be open, inclusive, and transparent, within the working definition of Internet governance as “the development and application by governments, the private sector and civil society, in their respective roles, of shared principles, norms, rules, decision-making procedures and programmes that shape the evolution and use of the Internet”.

37 Leave a comment on paragraph 37 0 We reaffirm the principles agreed in the Geneva Declaration that the management of the Internet encompasses both technical and public policy issues and should involve all stakeholder groups.

38 Leave a comment on paragraph 38 0 We call for further internationalization of Internet governance, including greater participation of developing countries and the full implementation of Enhanced Cooperation, as set forth in the Tunis Agenda, and taking note of the Working Group on Enhanced Cooperation, to enable governments, on an equal footing, to carry out their roles and responsibilities, in international public policy issues pertaining to the Internet, but not in the day-to-day technical and operational matters, that do not impact on international public policy issues.

39 Leave a comment on paragraph 39 0 We acknowledge the unique role of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) in the governance of the Internet, as a multi-stakeholder platform for discussion of Internet governance issues. We extend the IGF mandate of another X years. While taking into account the report of the Working Group on improvements to the IGF, we consider whether there is a need for cleared terms of reference for IGF’s governing structure, working methods, and outcomes. We note we need to continue building upon current efforts, to ensure support for the participation of least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing States.

40 Leave a comment on paragraph 40 0 Cyberspace

41 Leave a comment on paragraph 41 0 We recognize the growing role of cyberspace and reaffirm the importance of confidence and security-building initiatives for it to the future of Information Society.

42 Leave a comment on paragraph 42 0 Cyber security is an increasing challenge to all stakeholders, We reaffirm para 35 of the Geneva Declaration, which stipulates that “a global culture of cyber security need to be promoted, developed and implemented in cooperation with all stakeholders and international expert bodies” in order to foster trust and security in the emerging Information Society.

43 Leave a comment on paragraph 43 0 We call for increased global efforts and cooperation in combating cybercrime and countering cyber-threats.

44 Leave a comment on paragraph 44 0 Follow-up and Review

45 Leave a comment on paragraph 45 0 We are committed to achieving the WSIS vision through and enabling environment and global partnership that encourages innovation, technology transfer and investment. The Addis Ababa Action Agenda and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development provide an important framework for ICT policy and investment.

46 Leave a comment on paragraph 46 0 There will be a continues focus o mobilizing domestic public and private resources to spur ICT access and content creation. We recognize the importance of public-private partnerships, universal access strategies and other approaches to this end. We also recognize the need for increased focus on the contribution of ICTs to development by donors (public and private), international financial institutions and other development partners, especially through interventions that de-risk investment and catalyse new public and private finance. We express concern at the lack of progress on the Digital Solidarity Fund, welcomed in Tunis as an innovative financial mechanism of a voluntary nature, and we call for a reviews of options for its future.

47 Leave a comment on paragraph 47 0 We call for official development assistance and financial flows, including foreign direct investment, to developing countries where the need is greatest, in particular least developed countries, African countries, small island developing States and landlocked developing countries, in accordance with their national plans and programmes.

48 Leave a comment on paragraph 48 0 We call for intensified investment in content development, including content in a wider range of languages for universal inclusion.

49 Leave a comment on paragraph 49 0 Capacity-building remains a primary focus for all countries and people, particularly in the most vulnerable countries, including African countries, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing States, in order to leverage the full potential of ICTs and facilitate technology transfer. We encourage a prominent profile for ICT in the new technology mechanism established by the Addis Ababa Action Agenda.

50 Leave a comment on paragraph 50 0 Priority should be given to addressing cross-cutting technical challenges that affect the implementation of Action Lines adopted in the Tunis Agenda, including the implementation of IPv6, the deployment of Internet Exchange Points (IXPs) and the resilience of International ICT networks and resources.

51 Leave a comment on paragraph 51 0 We call for increased efforts to improve the extent of ICT data collection and analysis, including quality of connectivity, such as speed and consistency; disaggregation of data on ICT connectivity, use and creation.

52 Leave a comment on paragraph 52 0 We call for the continuation of the annual review of WSIS outcomes, and for an overall review of the implementation of the WSIS outcomes in X years. We also call for coordination of reporting on ICT for development within the context of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Source: http://wsislatam.codingrights.org/?page_id=4